Quatrains

Just to be One with you

He moved with giant strides

Before the silken reed

I dreamt upon a summer night

The slow mist covered soft

The wolf played act so meek

Music in soul played along

I am WOMAN

Life stills

Beyond borders

Light in the night

Mort d’un cygne

Magic

Journey of the Soul

Stardust

Per Mission to Love

They walk among us

Master of Illusion

Sorte demain

And the mirror crack’d

Les mots vrais

Contrainte

Au milieu coulait une blessure

I count my blessings

Fenêtre sur femme

In memoriam

Forgotten face

Forget me not

Oraison à mi-saison

La mort du petit frère

A brook of life

Collecting me

Journey of a soul

Memory’s kiss

L’amour en devenir

Qu’heures, cœur, qu’heurt

Shutter sky

Coeur d’antan

Heart in shadows

Through blood and tears

Hush baby pain slithers

Cépage d’un autre âge, les pages d’un autre outrage

Hark my heart I lay thee to discrown

De sel et de sang

Il était une fois

Las vide qui m’entoure

Wave me numb, wave me a crumb

Entre ciel et terre, entre paisible et délétère

Ignorance is not bliss

Pas Lolita

A new millenium

Eclipses de vie

Bis repetita placent

Un peu d’ailleurs, un pas meilleur

De mémoire d’homme

Tu étais demain

Un de mer deux de chair

Me in you and you t(h)ree in me

 

 

“A quatrain is a type of stanza, or a complete poem, consisting of four lines.

Existing in a variety of forms, the quatrain appears in poems from the poetic traditions of various ancient civilizations including Ancient India, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, and China, and continues into the 21st century, where it is seen in works published in many languages. During Europe’s Dark Ages, in the Middle East and especially Iran, polymath poets such as Omar Khayyam continued to popularize this form of poetry, also known as Ruba’i, well beyond their borders and time. Michel de Nostredame (Nostradamus) used the quatrain form to deliver his famous prophecies in the 16th century.

There are fifteen possible rhyme schemes, but the most traditional and common are: AAAA, ABAB, and ABBA.”

Source Wikipedia

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s